Reading Hooker Heaven

  Dead Light District/Jill Edmondson   When I first began to write long fiction, I cast my lot with the murder/mystery genre. Later, writing what I stubbornly take to be literary fiction, mysteries, murders, and suspense forever kept turning up in my writing like dead bodies. If you have the mystery knack, it’ll stick with…

All Rivers Flow through Mississippi

This is the first indie author interview for Gridley Fires. We’ve recently talked to Southern writer, Tom Honea, about his recent novel, A Confluence of Rivers. Tom’s epic story of a Mississippi family during the last years of the nineteenth century and into the twentieth is at its basis one common to us all: a story…

Stellar Writing Will Out

How Wendy Redbird Dancing Survived the Dark Ages of Nought, by Lyn Fairchild Hawks Sometimes a novel steps out of the safety of genre and takes its chances. Fairchild Hawks’ book is one such, and by my reckoning, it’s a success. The story here is of Wendy, a fatherless sixteen year-old girl coping with a…

The Novel As Raw Data

    Telegraph Avenue, by Michael Chabon   For all the verbiage there’s not much here – but then there is. If you’re looking for interior looks at characters and a memorable story, you won’t find either. But then that’s the way of this postmodern novel genre. (I won’t go into any depth here in…

Kerouac Still a Cult Figure

Jack Kerouac and his merry band of maniacs were about more than writing, although they were that, too. They were searchers for life’s underlying strata in a very Zen sense, and in the process they laid bare subcultures in the U.S. that were both rich and tragic. The below link gives an early review of…

One More For Ole Neil

    image via gq.com   I’ll continue my digression from the blog’s usual format for this one more post. Here’s one more Neil Young link.